Network

Network Coordinators

Lea Wohl von Haselberg studied Theatre, Film, and Media Studies at Goethe-University Frankfurt (Main). She wrote her PhD thesis on the depiction of Jewish characters in (West) German cinema and television in Hamburg and Haifa. She is an associate member of the Selma Stern Center for Jewish Studies and is currently working on a postdoc project on self-conceptions and experiences of Jewish filmmakers in the FRG at Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf, funded by the BMBF. In 2020 she will host the Blankensee Colloquium on Jewish film as a new field of research. She is a member of the editorial board of the bi-annually published magazine Jalta. Positionen zur jüdischen Gegenwart. Her research foci include German-Jewish film history, Jewish film, audio visual memory culture and anti-Semitism and film.
Contact: l.wohlvhaselberg@filmuniversitaet.de

Johannes Praetorius Rhein studied Theatre, Film, and Media Studies and Sociology in Frankfurt (Main) and Brussels. He is finishing his PhD project about the film producer Artur Brauner and his „Films against Forgetting“ which was funded by the Ernst Ludwig Ehrlich Studienwerk (2015-2019). With Julia Schumacher and Lea Wohl von Haselberg he co-edited the volume Schlechtes Gedächtnis. Kontrafaktische Darstellungen des NS in alten und neuen Medien (2019). He is working as a researcher for the international HERA-Project VICTOR-E – Visual Culture of Trauma, Obliteration and Reconstruction in Europe at the Goethe-University Frankfurt (Main) (2019-2022). His research interests involve German film history, postwar cinemas, production culture, cultural memories and the Frankfurt School.
Contact: rhein@tfm.uni-frankfurt.de

Members

Tobias Ebbrecht-Hartmann is a lecturer at the Department of Communication and Journalism and in the DAAD Center for German Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He received his PhD from the Freie University Berlin, and was a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the Bauhaus University Weimar, the International Institute for Holocaust Studies Yad Vashem, and at the Film University Babelsberg KONRAD WOLF. He is author of Geschichtsbilder im Medialen Gedächtnis: Filmische Narrationen des Holocaust (transcript, 2011) and Übergänge: Passagen durch eine deutsch-israelische Filmgeschichte (Neofelis, 2014). Currently, he is a consortium member of the EU-funded Horizon 2020 research and innovation project Visual History of the Holocaust: Rethinking Curation in the Digital Age (2019-2022). His research focuses on East- and West-German film history, audiovisual Holocaust memory, the use and appropriation of archival film footage, and German-Israeli film relations.
Contact: tobias.ebbrecht-hartmann@mail.huji.ac.il

Imme Klages holds a PhD from Goethe-University Frankfurt (Main) and published her thesis with the title I do not get rid of the ghosts. Zur Exilerfahrung in den Filmen Fred Zinnemanns: „The Search“ (1948), „The Nun’s Story“ (1959) und „Julia“ (1977) in 2018 with Schüren. Together with Bastian Blachut and Sebastian Kuhn she co-editied the volume Reflexionen des beschädigten Lebens? Nachkriegskino in Deutschland zwischen 1945 und 1962, published in 2015 with edition text + kritik. She is currently a post-doctorial researcher and lecturer in Film Studies at the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz. Her current research project together with Alexandra Schneider is Mapping German Film Migration. Her research foci are German film migration 1930-1950, Exile studies and transnational film history.
Contact: iklages@uni-mainz.de

Hilla Lavie is writing her dissertation at the Minerva Koebner Center for German History, the Hebrew University Jerusalem, under the supervision of Prof. Moshe Zimmermann and Prof. Ofer Ashkenazi. The dissertation’s title is “Imagining a Jewish State after the Holocaust: Representations of Israel in 1950s-1960s West German Films”. Her research won The Simon Wiesenthal Prize for a dissertation in the field of Holocaust research, 2018. She completed her MFA (Film Directing) and MA (Film Studies) degrees at the Department of Film and Television, Tel Aviv University. She directed documentary films in Israel and Germany funded by the Goethe Institute, the EVZ Fund and others. She was a guest scholar at the Dubnow Institute in Leipzig and the Friedrich Meinecke Institut at the Free University Berlin with the support of Armbruster fund, and for the last 5 years she serves as the editor of the Israeli academic journal “Slil” for history, cinema and television, published by the Koebner Center, the Hebrew University. 

Claudia Sandberg is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. She made the feature-length Películas escondidas. Un viaje entre el exilio y la memoria (2016) in collaboration with Alejandro Areal Vélez, a documentary that examines DEFA ‘Chile’ films as part of the audio-visual documentation of the Pinochet dictatorship. Claudia co-edited the volume Contemporary Latin American Cinema. Resisting Neoliberalism? (2018) together with Carolina Rocha, the forthcoming German Cinema Book 2 (2019) together with Tim Bergfelder, Erica Carter and Deniz Göktürk and is finishing a monograph on German-Jewish-Uruguayan filmmaker Peter Lilienthal. One of her most recent projects traces the participation of Chilean film personnel in German cinema East and West during the Cold War era. Her research focuses on contemporary German cinema, transnational cinematic relations between Europe and Latin America, and questions of exile and migration in film.
Contact: claudia.sandberg@unimelb.edu.au

Ulrike Schneider is Assistant Professor of German-Jewish Literature at the University of Potsdam. She received her PhD from the University of Potsdam, her thesis was published under the title Jean Améry und Fred Wander. Erinnerung und Poetologie in der deutsch-deutschen Nachkriegszeit in 2012. In 2017 she was Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Department of Germanic & Slavic Studies at the University of Georgia, Athens. Since 2014, she has been co-editor of the Yearbook Argonautenschiff of the Anna Seghers Association. With Helmut Peitsch and other colleagues she co-edited the volume Nachkriegsliteratur als öffentliche Erinnerung, published in 2018. Her research and teaching interests include German-Jewish literature of the 19the century until the present, Holocaust literature, and Post-War German literature as well as commemorative culture. Her current research projects focus on the work and life of the literary historian, editor and author Ludwig Geiger and also on the topic of Village and City in contemporary literature, which includes the project Dorf/Stadt erzählen. Aktuelle Dorf- und Stadtliteratur im Vergleich in cooperation with Natalie Moser.
Contact: ulschnei@uni-potsdam.de

Lisa Schoß studied German Literature and Cultural Theory at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Her doctoral thesis Jüdisches im Film der DDR. Untersuchung eines widersprüchlichen Zusammenhangs (Jewish Dimensions in East German Film. Investigation of an Apparent Antagonism) is close to completion. She is associated with the Selma Stern Centre for Jewish Studies Berlin-Brandenburg. Her main areas of research are the history of German Jews and the representation of “Jewishness” and the Shoah in film.
Contact: lisa.schoss@gmx.de

Julia Schumacher is currently a lecturer at the Arts, Culture and Media Department at the University of Groningen. She studied Philosophy and Media Studies at the University of Hamburg, and was lecturer and researcher at the latter university. In addition to her academic affiliations she worked for many years as location scout and location manager for inter/national film and TV-productions. Her research focuses on the aesthetics and historiography of film, TV, and online video, media theory, and popular representations of history. In her PhD thesis Realismus als Programm. Egon Monk – Modell einer Werkbiografie (Schüren, 2018) she intertwines a biographical study of German television’s prominent figure Egon Monk with perspectives on the aesthetical development of television drama and the cultural history of the Federal Republic. With Lea Wohl von Haselberg and Johannes Rhein she co-edited the volume Schlechtes Gedächtnis. Kontrafaktische Darstellungen des NS in alten und neuen Medien (Neofelis, 2019).
Contact: j.schumacher@rug.nl

Daniel Jonah Wolpert is a College Supervisor at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. Before taking up his current position he was the Evelyn-Travers-Clarke scholar at Trinity Hall at the University of Cambridge. He studied Philosophy, Mathematics and later Critical Theory at University College London and latterly at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Middlesex University working on Adorno and Heidegger, before embarking on his MPhil and PhD at Cambridge writing on German Films made under Allied Occupation. In 2012 he was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley working with Anton Kaes. He has published papers on the intersections of Jewish depictions in German film. As well as presently completing his monograph on Postwar German film his current project focuses on the image of Jews in legal contexts within German cinema from 1940 to 1968. A list of his publications may be found here.
Contact: djw88@cam.ac.uk

Associates

Guests

Chris Wahl studied Theatre, Film, and Television Studies as well as Romance Studies and German as a Foreign Language at Ruhr University Bochum, in Lisbon and in Curitiba (Brazil). He wrote his doctoral thesis on spoken language in fiction films (first talking movies, audiovisual translation, films without dialogue, polyglot films) in Bochum where he subsequently led a research project funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) on the multiple language versions (MLVs) produced by Ufa in the 1930s. With another DFG funded project on slow motion and superimpositions he moved to HFF “Konrad Wolf”, which is now known as Film University Babelsberg. There, he received a DFG Heisenberg professorship and led a DFG funded group researching amateur and student filmmaking in the GDR. Today, he is professor of Audiovisual Heritage and director of the MA program “Film Heritage” at the Film University. He is also co-director of the Brandenburg Center for Media Studies (ZeM) and member of the advisory council for film of the Goethe Institute. Additionally, he is co-founder an -curator of the film festival moving history in Potsdam. His current research interests include a theory of history films, an archaeology of audiovisual icons, and a critical re-edition of the German translation of Jay Leyda’s seminal text Films Beget Films (1964).
Contact: c.wahl@filmuniversitaet.de